Lincolnshire

Investment in training key for Lincolnshire construction

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Investment in training is crucial for the future of Lincolnshire’s construction industry, according to Chief Executive of Larkfleet Homes Karl Hick.

The UK construction industry is expected to create around 190,000 new jobs by 2018 in areas where there are not enough skilled workers to fill the vacancies.

However, Karl Hick of Borne-based Larkfleet Homes believes that it is down to the businesses in the industry to help through investment to train the next generation of workers.

He said: “Continuous investment in training is essential for the future of the construction industry.

“Construction and home building, in particular, are becoming high-tech operations driven by innovations which deliver energy-efficient solutions and cost-effective maintenance.

“The industry will increasingly require more of the brightest and best young people in all trades and professions.”

University Technical Colleges across the country, including one in Lincoln, are already helping the next generation to obtain the hands on experience required and to help them find the correct career path.

Many businesses, such as Larkfleet are already working with these colleges to help provide expertise and industry knowledge along with practical work placements.

Karl added: “Our business is changing and the type of people we will need to support successful housebuilding developments in the future will range from ‘hands-on’ craft and trades people across all our construction sites to engineers, scientists and technicians who will shape the industry’s future in research and development laboratories.

“We have also recruited local graduates who we are providing with business experience opportunities through structured training programmes.

“It is our hope and intention that the next generation of senior managers and construction professionals will emerge from these and other initiatives to help people to build their career in the ever-changing housebuilding industry.”